Author Topic: Partial, incomplete list of decommissioned/soon-to-be decommissioned warships  (Read 3250 times)

israeli

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PARTIAL, INCOMPLETE LIST OF DECOMMISSIONED/SOON-TO-BE DECOMMISSIONED NAVAL VESSELS


AUSTRALIA

* Adelaide (Perry) class frigates HMAS Adelaide and HMAS Canberra (to be turned into artificial reefs)
* Fremantle class patrol boats (most of them are to be scrapped :( )


BRUNEI

* Nakhoda Ragam class OPVs (did not enter service; Brunei might opt to sell them; see photo here)


DENMARK

* Flyvefisken class patrol vessel (four decommissioned, three of them sold to Lithuania)


FINLAND

* Helsinki class missile boats (two ships transferred to Croatia)
* Turunmaa class fast gunboats


FRANCE

* D'Estienne D'Orves class corvettes


GERMANY

* Gepard class missile boats (to be replaced by new corvettes from 2008 onwards)
* Type 206A submarines
* Walchensee class tanker


GREECE

* Combattante II class missile boats (one sold to Georgia, which was later destroyed by Russian forces; three more left)


INDIA

* Nilgiri (Leander) class frigates


ISRAEL

* Dabur class patrol boats
* Sa'ar 4 class missile boats (INS Nitzachon and INS Atzmaut)


NORWAY

* Hauk class patrol boat (most vessels still in service)
* Oslo class frigates (all now decommissioned; HMNoS Narvik now a museum ship)


PORTUGAL

* Albacora (Daphne) class submarines
* Baptista de Andrade class corvettes
* Joăo Coutinho class corvettes


SINGAPORE

* Sea Wolf class missile gunboats


SOUTH AFRICA

* Warrior (Sa'ar 4) class missile boats


SPAIN

* Baleares (modified Knox) class frigates
* Descubierta class frigates


SWEDEN

* Göteborg class corvettes (two already decommissioned)


TURKEY

* five Tepe (Knox) class frigates


UNITED KINGDOM

* Castle class OPVs
* Hunt class mine countermeasures vessels (one ship converted to training ship; two awaiting disposal)
* Round Table class LSTs (one sold to Brazil; two/three awaiting disposal)
* Rover class tankers (RFA Grey Rover withdrawn from service)
* Type 42 destroyers (HMS Cardiff, HMS Glasgow and HMS Newcastle awaiting disposal)


UNITED STATES

* Austin class LPDs
* Newport class LSTs (two planned to be transferred to Peru; two more left)
* Osprey class minehunters (some were sold to various navies)
* Perry class frigates (USS McInerney being offered to Pakistan; USS George Philip and USS Sides rejected by Turkey)
* Tarawa class LHAs (one already sunk as a target)
« Last Edit: November 23, 2008, 12:46:59 PM by israeli »
"I'm very determined. If I decide what something is worth doing, then I'll put my heart and soul to it. The whole ground can be against me, but if I know it is right, I'll do it. That's the business of a leader." - Lee Kuan Yew

VAguy

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Navy sink list includes Forrestal, destroyers

By Zachary M. Peterson - Staff writer
Posted : Tuesday Feb 26, 2008 14:30:56 EST
   
The Navy plans to sink 15 decommissioned ships and scrap an additional 24 in the next five years, according to the latest shipbuilding plan.

In fiscal 2009, the Navy will sink the Yellowstone-class destroyer Acadia, the Spruance-class destroyer Conolly and the acoustic research ship Hayes. The Hayes is still active and will be decommissioned sometime this year, according to the Navy. The service requested $5.4 million to sink the three ships in the fiscal 2009 budget presented to Congress in early February.

Two ships in the current plan are slated to sink and become artificial reefs, the plan notes: the Spruance-class destroyer Arthur W. Radford, which rests in Philadelphia, and the auxiliary aircraft landing training ship and former carrier Forrestal, currently berthed in Newport, R.I. Specific sink dates have not been set for these two ships because plans must be coordinated with Congress and other government agencies, the plan states.

The Radford was named after the first Navy admiral to hold the position of chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and was decommissioned in March 2003 after about 26 years in service. The Forrestal spent 38 years in service. The ship was the first of its class of aircraft carriers, and was known unofficially as the “Forrest fire” due to the number of fires onboard. Innovations on the Forrestal-class carriers included an angled flight deck and a steam catapult. The ship was named after former Navy secretary James Forrestal, who was also the first defense secretary.

The majority of the ships the Navy plans to sink — 11 vessels of the 15 — are auxiliary ships. These ships will be replaced by T-AKE dry cargo and ammunition ships. The Lewis and Clark-class T-AKE ships replace three auxiliary ships: the Kilauea-class ammunition ships, the Mars-class combat stores ships and — when operating with a Henry J. Kaiser-class oiler — the Supply-class fast combat support ships.

The Navy plans to buy 12 T-AKE ships by fiscal 2012. Right now, there are three T-AKEs in service with a fourth, the Richard E. Byrd set to enter service this year. The Navy plans to scrap 24 ships in the next five years, but specific dates are not provided in the fiscal 2009 30-year ship plan. Nearly half of the ships — 10 hulls — are submarines, nine of which are nuclear powered; the Navy does not sink nuclear ships due to environmental concerns.

“For nuclear ships, dismantling through a special recycling process is the only viable option,” the plan states. “Disposal of conventionally powered ships by sinking will usually be conducted as part of an approved training exercise or to support weapons testing requirements.” according to the Navy plan.

The Navy’s fleet of inactive ships has been reduced by more than two-thirds in the last decade, the plan notes. An inventory of 195 ships in 1997 is now down to 62 ships, the document says.

“Over the past seven years, the Navy’s average cost to dismantle conventionally powered Navy inactive ships in the U.S. is $300 per ton,” said Kathleen Roberts, a Naval Systems Command spokeswoman.

Further, it costs the Navy $14 million per year to maintain its current inactive ship inventory, Roberts said.

The Navy is asking Congress for $110 million total in fiscal 2009 to pay for ship deactivations and disposal, according to the budget request.

Plans for how and when the Navy moves forward with its inactive fleet are made at the service’s annual ship disposition review conference. The next conference is slated for November or December this year, said Lt. Clay Doss, a Navy spokesman.

Sinking
These ships will be disposed of by sinking in the listed fiscal years.

* 2009: destroyer tender Acadia, destroyer Conolly, both no longer in service, and research ship Hayes.

* 2010: combat store ships Concord, San Jose, Spica and Niagara Falls.

* 2011: combat store ship Saturn and ammunition ship Kilauea.

* 2012: ammunition ships Flint, Shasta, Mount Baker and Kiska.

The decommissioned auxiliary aircraft landing training ship — and former carrier — Forrestal and destroyer Arthur W. Radford also are expected to be sunk, but no time frame has been determined.

Scrapping
These decommissioned ships are scheduled to be dismantled in the next five years: destroyer tender Puget Sound; command ship Coronado; submarine tenders Simon Lake, L.Y. Spear and McKee; cruisers Yorktown, Vincennes and Thomas S. Gates; aircraft carriers Independence and Constellation; amphibious transport dock Austin; helicopter amphibious assault ship New Orleans; dock landing ships Anchorage and Fort Fisher; submarine Trout; and nuclear submarines Drum, Omaha, Cincinnati, New York City, Groton, Birmingham, Phoenix and Baltimore. The fast-attack submarine Los Angeles, still in commission, also is on the list to be dismantled.

http://www.militarytimes.com/news/2008/02/navy_shipdisposal_080223w/

2 Spru-can destroyers:
Arthur W. Radford DD-968 1977-2003 Stricken, to be disposed of in support of Fleet training exercise
Conolly DD-979 1978-1998 Stricken, due to be sunk as target

Three Ticonderoga class missile cruisers:
Yorktown CG-48 Ingalls 1984–2004 Stricken, to be disposed of
Vincennes CG-49 Ingalls 1985–2005 Stricken, to be disposed of
Thomas S. Gates CG-51 BIW 1987–2005 Stricken, to be disposed of

USS New Orleans (LPH-11) was an Iwo Jima-class amphibious assault ship in the United States Navy. She was the third Navy ship named for the city of New Orleans, Louisiana.

USS Anchorage (LSD-36) was a dock landing ship of the United States Navy.
update:
She was decommissioned on 1 October 2003.
Transfer to Taiwan was approved by the United States Senate in November 2003.


spiderweb6969

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ok for Singapore, soon, the 11 Fearless class will also to be replace with a multi purpose vessel....according to this article....

« Last Edit: December 02, 2008, 06:22:49 PM by spiderweb6969 »

israeli

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the Spanish Navy retired the Newport class LST Hernán Cortés last November. that brings the number of available Newport class LSTs to three (one in Spain- the Hernán Cortés- and two in the US- the USS Tuscaloosa, which is stored in Pearl Harbor, HI, and the USS Boulder, which is stored in NISMF Philadelphia). :)


Quote
Hernán Cortés Officially Decommissioned From the Spanish Navy
Naval Station Rota, Spain's Notes
Tuesday, November 17, 2009 at 4:49pm


Chief of Logistic Support, Bay of Cadiz, Adm. Jose Angel Pita Rodrigo, presided over a ceremony in which the disembarkation ship Hernán Cortés was decommissioned. Nov 12, officially struck from the Spanish Navy Registry.

Over the years, Hernán Cortés (L 41) and her sister ship, Pizarro (L 42), have participated in peace keeping operations in the former Yugoslavia and Albania, as well as humanitarian missions in Central America.

Hernán Cortés also conducted numerous national and international exercises, such as Destined Glory and Tapón with the Spanish Marines. She has also been part of the Military Naval training cruise and has collaborated with the Spanish Army as support for military logistic transportation.

This ship belongs to the Newport class and was built at the National Steel and Ship Building Company in San Diego and commissioned as USS Barnstable County (LST-1197). It was launched in 1971 and in May 1972 was assigned to the U.S. Atlantic Fleet amphibious force.

It was transferred August 1994 to the Spanish Navy through the Security Assistance Program, foreign military sale.

Cmdr. Alejandro Herrero Pita assumed command May 10, 2008 and is the last of the Cortés’10 commanders’.

Spanish article link: http://www.armada.mde.es/ArmadaPortal/page/Portal/ArmadaEspannola/conocenos_noticias/00_noticias--2009--11--NT-249-Baja-Armada-HernanCortes_es?_selectedNodeID=294007&_pageAction=selectItem
« Last Edit: March 07, 2010, 10:10:45 AM by israeli »
"I'm very determined. If I decide what something is worth doing, then I'll put my heart and soul to it. The whole ground can be against me, but if I know it is right, I'll do it. That's the business of a leader." - Lee Kuan Yew

israeli

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the Castle class OPVs were sold last May to... BANGLADESH. too bad the PN failed to take a look at them. :(


Quote
http://www.defenseindustrydaily.com/Bangladesh-Secures-2-Used-British-OPVs-06369/


Bangladesh Secures 2 Used British OPVs
04-May-2010 13:45 EDT


Britain’s 2 Castle Class offshore patrol vessels (OPVs) were slated for sale to Pakistan, after more than 25 years of service in the Royal Navy. That sale fell through in 2007, and HMS Leeds Castle and HMS Dunbarton Castle were decommissioned in 2005 and 2008. Bangladesh still needs patrol vessels, however, and has bought the 2 ships following 6 months of negotiations. A “multi-million pound” contract will see 2 OPVs towed to the A&P Tyne shipyard for a massive overhaul to their propulsion systems, generators, and crew quarters. The work is expected to provide for up to 100 staff and subcontractor jobs.

The 1,430 ton Castle Class OPVs are combat ships, but they’re very lightly armed, with just a 30mm cannon and 4 GPMG class 7.62mm machine guns. There had been reports of negotiations for a fit-out of anti-ship missiles, but that will not be included. The ships remain versatile, however, with features that can include detergent spraying equipment to disperse oil slicks, laying mines in wartime, taking 50-120 troops on board if necessary, and a flight deck that can land helicopters up to H-3 Sea King size. BBC News.
"I'm very determined. If I decide what something is worth doing, then I'll put my heart and soul to it. The whole ground can be against me, but if I know it is right, I'll do it. That's the business of a leader." - Lee Kuan Yew

israeli

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http://www.seawaves.com/shipdecommissionings.asp


among those in the list of recently or soon-to-be decommissioned ships include:

* all three Niels Juel class corvettes of the Royal Danish Navy (decommissioned in 2009; all awaiting disposal).

* all Sea Wolf class missile boats of the Singaporean Navy.

* FS Francis Garnier, one of the BATRAL class small LSTs of the French Navy, which was decommissioned last March 18, 2009.

* FS Persée and FS Verseau, two of France's Eridan (Tripartite) class minehunters, both of which were decommissioned recently (2009 and 2010).

* replacement of the two oldest Type 209 submarines of the Turkish Navy (TCG Atilay and TCG Saldiray) by Type 214 submarines.

* retirement of six Type 206A submarines of the German Navy

* the scheduled retirement of US Navy Perry class frigates, starting with the USS McInerney being transferred to Pakistan this year and two Perrys being proposed for transfer to Taiwan in 2011.

* the scheduled retirement of four US Coast Guard Hamilton class high endurance cutters (USCGC Jarvis, USCGC Hamilton, USCGC Chase and USCGC Rush) by 2011.
« Last Edit: September 08, 2010, 03:27:06 AM by israeli »
"I'm very determined. If I decide what something is worth doing, then I'll put my heart and soul to it. The whole ground can be against me, but if I know it is right, I'll do it. That's the business of a leader." - Lee Kuan Yew