Author Topic: Lupo Class Frigate, A69 Corvette for Phil. Navy  (Read 2741 times)

Bruno Antonini

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Lupo Class Frigate, A69 Corvette for Phil. Navy
« on: September 09, 2004, 05:48:17 AM »
If the Philippine Navy is after "surplus" warships, why not acquire the "surplus" Lupo Class Multi-Role Frigates from the Italian Navy and "surplus" D'Estienne D'Orves (A69) Class Missile Corvettes from the French Navy?


Bruno Antonini

Me262

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No monie.
« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2004, 06:21:27 AM »
Our credit rating is high. As you see, we are still paying the moot bataan nuke plant. If you have some financing plans payable in 200 years, we'll take it!  put some extra missile's too in the contract.

israeli

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Re: No monie.
« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2004, 06:27:03 AM »
Quote from: Me262
Our credit rating is high. As you see, we are still paying the moot bataan nuke plant. If you have some financing plans payable in 200 years, we'll take it!  put some extra missile's too in the contract.



speaking of the BNPP, here are articles about this White Elephant in Morong:


Bataan Nuclear Power Plant: The 30 year old White Elephant
http://www.kwebgimo.com/more.php?id=8
August 11, 2004


I have a confession to make. I only knew recently that we actually have this power in our country, an actual completely built nuclear power plant in Bataan. If I didn't read the Daily Inquirer the other day, I wouldn't be aware of it.

The Bataan Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) was built in Morong, Bataan during the Marcos regime in 1977 because of the power crisis during that time. Westinghouse Electric Corporation was contracted to build it and was completed in 1984.

The Bataan nuclear power plant has 2 nuclear reactors each capable of generating 600 MWatts of power. That is enough power to light the whole luzon, if not, even the whole country at that time. The cost of each nuclear reactor amounted to 1.9 Billion US Dollars. It was considered as the biggest project the Philippines has undertaken in history. But ever since it was completed in 1984, it was never used up until now. It never operated.That was 30 years of idleness despite its completeness and capability. Main reason was its safety, considering that the plant was actually built in an earthquake prone area. Another thing is the reliability of the technology since during that time, nuclear power design was still at its development and not yet perfected. It was declared since then that the plant was unsafe to operate.

So knowing all these, I guess what really striked me is that Billion Dollar amount. Lets not forget that it was loaned. And, let us not forget that until now, our government is still paying that debt even though its not being used. The bill we pay to US amounts to 155,000 US dollars per day since 1984. Politics and corruption. The root of all stupidity in our government.

This just gave me a thought. All these years, the government has been paying the US bank Eximbank more money than spending them on us, the citizens. Imagine that 155,000 us dollars every day.

Politics and corruption, The roots of stupidity in our government. Corruption has sure kept this country under bondage. Marcos together with a crony during that time recieved a commision from that project. Westinghouse actually bribed a crony of his so that the contract will go to them. Westinghouse was actually bidding with General Electric but Westinghouse won the bid even thought GE was more experienced in nuclear technology.

My beloved countrymen, I'll just leave to you all the thinking. Imagine those million dollars spent over 30 years. Just imagine how many schools it could have built and how many scholars it can fund. Just imagine how many free houses can be built for the poor with that money. Imagine how many facilities it can build for the benefit of ours. Imagine how many MRT lines it can build, maybe even subways. Imagine how big an international airport it can build. Iimagine how many environmental cleanups it can do. Imagine the scientific research it can fund to unleash indispensable discoveries from our brilliant scientists. Imagine how many factories it can build to provide work for the Filipinos. Just Imagine the WASTE.


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Philippine nuclear plant costs 155,000 dlrs a day but no electricity
http://www.spacewar.com/2004/040630032556.4we4ezy4.html
MANILA (AFP) Jun 30, 2004


Nearly 30 years after work began on the Bataan nuclear power plant just north of Manila, Filipino taxpayers are still paying 155,000 dollars a day in interest on a structure that has never produced one watt of power.
Thelmo Cunanan, chief executive of state-run Philippine National Oil Co., said it had become the country's most outstanding white elephant.

"The fact that we are still paying interest on a project that is 30 years old and has not produced a watt of electricity should send at least one positive signal to the investment community," he told AFP in a telephone interview.

The signal was that "If we enter an agreement at least we pay our bills. There were times when I thought: why should we? Why don't we simply turn our backs and walk away from it but that is not the way we Filipinos do business."

The Bataan nuclear power plant was a knee jerk reaction by former Philippine dictator Ferdinand Marcos to the energy crisis of the early 1970s.

The oil embargo had put a heavy strain on the Philippine economy and Marcos saw nuclear power as the best way forward in terms of meeting the country's future power needs and lessening the nation's reliance on imported oil.

Construction began in 1976 and was completed in 1984 at a cost of 2.3 billion dollars.

The power station, 60 miles (97 kilometres) north of Manila, has been the centre of controversy from the day construction began.

When Marcos was overthrown by the so-called People Power Revolution in early 1986 a team of international inspectors visited the site and declared it unsafe and inoperable as it was built near major earthquake fault lines and near the Pinatubo volcano which at the time was dormant.

The first post-Marcos government of Corazon Aquino sealed the nuclear plant's fate for good when it banned the use of nuclear power and enshrined it into the constitution.

Debt repayment on the plant is the country's biggest single obligation.

Successive governments have looked at ways of converting the plant into an oil, coal or gas fired power station.

According to Cunanan a South Korean company recently expressed an interest in taking over the nuclear power station and developing it as a commercial operation. But the provision in the constitution ruled it out.

Cunanan said it would be unfair to name the company but said the government has not ruled out converting the plant into a fossil fuel power station.

Some studies in the past have shown that converting the plant may be too expensive.

The plant itself has been maintained despite never having been commissioned.

A Westinghouse light water reactor, it was designed to produce some 621 megawatts of electricity.

Much of the technology used in the plant was early 1970s but modified following the Three Mile Island accident in the United States in 1979.
"I'm very determined. If I decide what something is worth doing, then I'll put my heart and soul to it. The whole ground can be against me, but if I know it is right, I'll do it. That's the business of a leader." - Lee Kuan Yew

CityHunter

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Lupo Class Frigate, A69 Corvette for Phil. Navy
« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2004, 06:26:17 PM »
Yup, it would be extremely foolish to resort to converting the BNPP.  It would be much cheaper to do one from scratch.  From memory, the BNPP was controversial as the land where it was built was highly questioned.  It being on a suspected fault line.  Another thing was the security not only of the plant itself but of the radioactive waste and of how to properly dispose of it.  Terrorists could make much use of it even if it isn;t in bomb form.  Just threaten to spread the contents on a major water supply and we'll all cave in to their demands.

There are a lot of alternative sources for power.  We have one of the world's plentiful geothermal and hydro sources so why isn't our government looking into developing these (not to mention wind and solar power)?  Is it they are blinded by too much 'kotong'?  Plus we could emulate Singapore's method of using trash to generate power (they even pay for your trash unlike here we pay to have our trash taken away).  We could even do away with all these silly electrical cobwebs we see in our homes and streets by going back to Tesla's invention (though I doubt those power companies having a heart to resorting to this course).  I guess in this time of crisis, us ordinary folk have to have our voices heard and acted upon.
Long life through superior firepower!

CityHunter

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Lupo Class Frigate, A69 Corvette for Phil. Navy
« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2004, 06:31:10 PM »
Add ko pa.  The BNPP is operational though only for research and maintenance.  Though I doubt this news if filtered to the public as it would generate too much negative reaction.
Long life through superior firepower!

datu

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..
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2004, 06:54:27 PM »
problems with these 2 types of ships.

Lupos have very large crew sizes, nearly 200 per ship, while singapore's project delta la fayette variant is approximately 60 per ship.

A-69 lacks helicopter platform or hangar facilites, which is needed for over-the-horizon SSM targetting.

PROS:
Lupos are very fast, 32+knots top speed, 20miles sustained economical speed. Otomats are huge monsters.

A-69 is very economical, maintenance friendly,  and has already been offered for lease, which was also declined by PN.
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Bulog

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Re: ..
« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2004, 07:57:26 PM »
Quote from: datu
problems with these 2 types of ships.

Lupos have very large crew sizes, nearly 200 per ship, while singapore's project delta la fayette variant is approximately 60 per ship.

A-69 lacks helicopter platform or hangar facilites, which is needed for over-the-horizon SSM targetting.

PROS:
Lupos are very fast, 32+knots top speed, 20miles sustained economical speed. Otomats are huge monsters.

A-69 is very economical, maintenance friendly,  and has already been offered for lease, which was also declined by PN.


Maybe just one to become our new flagship Lakai. Sometimes size can bluff. Italians maybe could reduce the price for the sake of the catholic brotherhood.

Danny A.

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Lupo Class Frigate, A69 Corvette for Phil. Navy
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2004, 04:41:42 AM »
Why did the Navy decline the A69 corvette offer?  When will the Navy decide to advance its modernization?  Many opportunities have been passed upon by the Navy already.  Like the Air Force, it cannot act fast in deciding on its modernization plan.