Author Topic: Merged: Strategic Sail Plan 2020 / The navy charts a new course  (Read 19636 times)

sumomo

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The navy charts  a new course
By James Mananghaya
Sunday, May 20, 2007
Page: 1

“The Philippines is a maritime country. The ships are what make us a Navy.  Without the ships there is no navy.  It is therefore very clear that our top priority should be to be able to deploy our ships to guard our waters,” Vice Admiral Rogelio Calunsag, the Navy’s 29th flag officer in command, said when he assumed the Navy’s top post last December.

Despite being inadequately equipped, the Philippine Navy has been an example of the Filipino’s ingenuity and resilience, being able to carry out its missions with limited resources, which it hopes to address in the coming years by enhancing the operational readiness of their ships and improving the skills of sailors.

Presently, the 20,000-strong Navy, including the elite Marines, is carrying out various missions, combat and otherwise, using 54 operational vessels, five aircraft, and 53 armored fighting vehicles, mostly refurbished.

But what keeps the organization going is the high morale and motivation of its men and women, who remain steadfast in their sworn duty to protect the country at all cost.

“Oplan Ultimatum”

When the Armed Forces of the Philippines launched a massive campaign last year against al-Qaeda-linked militants in the South, the Navy played a vital role of providing naval blockades within the island province of Sulu to prevent the escape of terrorists, particularly the Abu Sayyaf and their Jemaah Islamiyah cohorts.

 The Navy scored a major victory in this campaign when elements of the Marine Force Recon Class 12, led by the unassuming and humble 2Lt. Romulo Dimayuga, neutralized Abu Sayyaf chieftain Khadaffy Janjalani, who carries a $5-million bounty on his head, in a fierce and bloody encounter in Barangay Tugas, Patikul, Sulu.

The young officer and some of his men were wounded in that pre-dawn clash.

Six marines were also slain in a close-quarter battle with Janjalani’s followers, their ultimate sacrifice considered the country’s contribution to the global campaign against terror.

 The Navy’s elite Special Operations Group, which is equivalent to the US Navy Seals, together with Marines and Army Scout Rangers, killed Abu Hubaida and Jundam Jumalul alias “Black Killer”, two notorious Abu Sayyaf leaders, and five of their cohorts, in a high seas clash off Tawi-Tawi

 This major feat was attributed to the revival of the Fleet-Marine Team that harnessed the capability of the Fleet and the Marines into one cohesive and potent naval force. The complimentary set-up provides needed support to sustain naval operations.

 Only last month, Marines took over the camp of Habier Malik, a commander of the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) in the village of Bitan-ag, Panamao town in Sulu after the rebel group launched mortar attacks that killed a child.

 With Oplan Domino 2 replacing Oplan Ultimatum, the navy vows to continue the mission, until the terrorist leaders and their cohorts are captured or neutralized.

 Aside from addressing terrorism in the Southern part of the country, the Navy has also contributed to the neutralization of some Communist New People’s Army leaders, as part of Oplan Bantay Laya, which is the government’s internal security master plan.

Sail Plan 2030

By 2030, the navy will modernize into a more capable organization with the latest in military hardware to equip its units with the right tools for the job.

One of the first the projects undertaken under the capability upgrade program was the transfer of two Patrol Killer Medium (PKM) Gunboats, identified as PKMs 223 and 232, from the Republic of Korea (ROK).

Another project being developed and enhanced is Project Phalanx, a mobile remote operated military hardware designed for close quarter battle in urban settings. The Command also supported the repair and acquisition of various weapons and ammunitions for its Navy and Marine units.

 The Navy also distributed satellite phones, radio and TV sets and programming kits to units assigned in remote areas which will significantly support the conduct of various operations. Three Jacinto-class patrol vessels are also undergoing rehabilitation at a facility in Iloilo.

Equally or even more important than improving military hardware is improving the living conditions of the troops. In this regard, Calunsag’s predecessor, retired Vice Adm. Mateo Mayuga initiated the recovery of some 200 quarters occupied by overstaying retired military officers at Fort Bonifacio.

Calunsag has tasked the commanders of all Naval forces and support units all over the country to address the improvement of living conditions, working environment and other administrative requirements of fleet-marine.

Aside from dealing with terrorists and Communist rebels, the Navy has taken on the responsibility of keeping the seas safe for all seafarers by conducting operations against pirates. It also complements law enforcement agencies in implementing maritime laws and helps in the campaign against all forms of smuggling, illegal logging and poaching in protected marine reserves such as the Tubattaha Reef in Palawan.

The navy has also provided assistance to victims of various calamities that hit the country recently by transporting much-needed relief goods, providing vehicles for evacuation and utilizing their engineering units for rehabilitation of affected areas. Disaster response units of the Navy are equipped with amphibious vehicles, pump boats, heavy equipment, armored vehicles, fire trucks and ambulances.

These disasters, including other crisis situations such as the Lebanon conflict and Malaysia’s crackdown on illegal migrants, gave birth to the idea of acquiring a multi-purpose vessel which would be used for mass evacuation, as well as command and control for government agencies involved in such kinds of operations.

Navy spokesman Commander Giovanni Carlo Bacordo told STARweek that the MPV could be used as a floating government center which would immediately be dispatched in times of disaster or other crisis situations that require immediate action.

“It would be a vessel where representatives of government agencies involved in disasters would be on board.  Our personnel would man the ship,” he said.

“The main target should be to save lives, provide immediate aid to a distressed population, accommodate victims on board if needed, and clear the way for fresh assistance and support, thus the platform should be capable of embarking food provisions, medical supplies, clothing and a large quantity of extra equipment for clearing operations,” Bacordo said. The instant platform of the vessel may also be reconfigured as a hospital ship or a floating government center.

“It should be able to evacuate casualties and provide medical support and emergency treatment for serious injuries as well,” he said.

Aside from this, it could also be used to evacuate Filipinos if they get caught in the middle of a conflict in”other countries, such as what happened in Lebanon, where the only way out is through the sea.

 “The Lebanon crisis taught us the need to conquer the tyranny of distance.  Just as in the aftermath of disasters in our archipelago when airstrips are obstructed, roads or railways are blocked, ports are damaged or there are no safe harbors, the only way out of Lebanon was through the sea,” Bacordo said.

Mayuga was the one who oversaw the development and operationalization of Coast Watch South (CWS) aimed at addressing current and emerging maritime security threats, especially in the country’s southern territory.

The CWS is a framework for an inter-agency surveillance and response mechanism for addressing transnational crimes, maritime terrorism, and environmental concerns in the Sulu and Celebes seas. The CWS also offers a framework for developing international cooperation by strengthening established bilateral and regional agreements.

Primarily designed as a monitoring, control, and surveillance system, the CWS comprises the Navy’s network of coast watch stations scattered all over the country, national inter-agency maritime patrol operations, and existing bilateral arrangements with Indonesia and Malaysia.

The Philippine Navy is also cooperating with foreign navies in patrolling common borders and in keeping track of transnational maritime threats for a secure maritime environment. Relations with foreign navies are constantly being strengthened by the conduct of joint naval exercises with allies, with the intention of working together to forge stronger ties against common enemies.

http://www.philstar.com/index.php?p=49&type=2&sec=52&aid=3214

Also in the report (in the magazine version) was a picture of a gunboat numbered 351, does anyone knows what is the class of this ship, my guess is a Swift Mk.2, but i'm not sure though, i'll try to scan the whole mag (it wont fit in the scanner ^_^), when i have some more spare time to do so.
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phichanad

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The Philippine Navy Strategic Sail Plan 2020 - what is in this plan?
« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2008, 08:39:04 AM »
I have read somewhere in this forum about the existence of a "Philippine Navy Strategic Sail Plan 2020", but no details about the plan was made known in this forum...

Accidentally I saw in Wikipedia while browsing the Philippine Navy article, there is this post on the reference section about a book "The Philippine Navy Strategic Sail Plan 2020 Book 1 2007"...

Anyone know what is written inside that book? How many books are there, since I assume the existence of a Book 1, there might be a Book 2 or more. Is it available to the public? Are there insiders here who can verify this book/s? Thanks very much!
« Last Edit: April 09, 2008, 02:31:54 AM by phichanad »

40niner_com

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Re: The Philippine Navy Strategic Sail Plan 2020 - what is in this plan?
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2008, 04:07:07 PM »
http://www.navy.mil.ph/Press_Release/2008/Feb/17Feb08.html

Navy envisions strong sea power for 2020
February 17, 2008

Navy Chief Vice Admiral Rogelio Calunsag launched the new plotted course of the Philippine Navy to become a strong and credible maritime force by the year 2020 during the book launching of “Philippine Navy Strategic Sail Plan 2020” at the Officers Clubhouse in Fort Bonifacio Naval Station, Taguig City last weekend.

Sail Plan 2020 was conceptualized last November 2006 with more than 60 naval officers who brainstormed the issues besetting the Navy today during a leadership planning conference held in Tagaytay. The research was evaluated by organizational management experts from the Institute of Solidarity in Asia headed by Dr. Jesus Estanislao, who engineered the framework of the Navy’s new charted course.

Admiral Calunsag said that the Navy has adopted Sail Plan 2020 to its new vision and mission for the organization and is geared towards building sound fightling capabilities, develop better fighting doctrines and train highly skilled personnel. However, he stressed out that the Navy’s greatest impediment is the lack funds to support the build up since the Navy is mainly dependent on budget appropriations.

Acquiring new and more fighting ships is the alarming concern emphasized in Sail Plan 2020. Dr. Estanislao revealed that maritime states like the Philippines are economically and geographically advantaged over landlock states, but a strong Navy is what it takes to attain that threshold. As an archipelago, the Philippines’ location has the world’s strategic maritime highways and that the need for a strong maritime power is the ultimate solution to the nation’s prevailing security threats.

Since time immemorial, the ingenuinity of the Filipino sailors and marines has tested the Navy’s resillience in keeping up with World War II vintage ships ship-shape and operational. The continous use of these vessels, however, has proven very expensive for the Navy to maintain and operate over the years.

During the Marcos era the Philippine Navy stood at the helm of Southeast Asia’s leading military power and stands at the least today. Based on the projections of the annual budget appropriations, the Navy will not be able to procure or build another vessel until 2017. Until then, our vintage ships will keep watch of more than 1,250,000 square kilometers of oceanic waters that defines the country’s territory and houses one of the world’s leading sources of fisheries and mineral deposits.

Calunsag said that to attain Sail Plan 2020, the Navy may have to find brilliant alternatives to procure additional assets within the next decade, such as plans to acquire a Multi Purpose Vessel, which has the capacity to accommodate three helicopters and small crafts suitable to serve as floating government centers, or as a hopital ship during national calamities and reach out to stricken far flung areas.

“Sail Plan 2020 is not far-fetched if Filipinos and legislators have an appreciation for our geographical potential both economically and in terms of its campaign against global terrorism. This is a strategic solution to the nation’s security concerns,” Calunsag said.


« Last Edit: April 09, 2008, 04:12:26 PM by 40niner_com »
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Adroth

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Re: Merged: Strategic Sail Plan 2020 / The navy charts a new course
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2008, 04:44:57 PM »
Hopefully this Sail Plan will address the problems cited in this paper

here is a 2001 paper about the sad state of the Philippine navy training. it gives numerous anecdotes about how bad our navy has deteriorated. I wonder, if things have improved since the 1990s:
www.apan-info.net/partners/ph_naval_edu/Related%20Papers/Commandant's%20Paper%20of%20Capt%20Araojo.pdf

Moderator's note:

The document above can now be found here:

TOWARDS A RESPONSIVE EDUCATION AND SKILLS TRAINING PROGRAM IN PREPARATION FOR PN MODERNIZATION


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firstknight

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Re: Merged: Strategic Sail Plan 2020 / The navy charts a new course
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2008, 01:07:43 AM »
the govt & the navy should also consider in their sail plan 2020 how they can involve local shipyards like aboitiz/tsuneshi, fb marine/aboitiz, hanjin, etc... sure they can provide us the vessels needed by the navy  :D

Adroth

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Re: Merged: Strategic Sail Plan 2020 / The navy charts a new course
« Reply #5 on: July 02, 2009, 02:31:45 PM »
Philippine Navy Strategizes Future in Recent Seminar

http://www.navy.mil.ph/news.htm

The Philippine Navy recently concluded an Active Archipelagic Defense Strategy (AADS) Seminar Workshop at the Headquarters Philippine Navy, Roxas Boulevard, Manila last May 13 to 14, 2009. This activity strategizes the naval development that sets out the means and ways on how the Philippine Navy intends to evolve into the Navy of the future over the years.

With the theme: “Strategizing the Future Philippine Navy”, this seminar aims to define the future of the PN in the light of the country’s national interests at stake and the emerging maritime security environment. It also rationalizes the future of the PN force structure and its most effective force employment founded on the need to attain naval dominance in future battlespace. This also provides the necessary guidance to direct the efforts of the Navy to effectively undertake its directed mandate and how naval forces may be used to implement state domestic and foreign policies. In addition to these goals, the seminar also echoes the pronouncement by the AFP’s DSOM (Defense System of Management) to have a capability-based development of the Armed Forces of the Philippines and a strategy-driven management and employment of the country’s military force.

Attending this event are members of Philippine maritime security agencies, academe and other interested groups and individuals. They shall draw upon the perspectives, experience and expertise through facilitated plenary and focused group discussions.

The speakers include USEC Antonio Santos Jr., DND Undersecretary for Defense Affairs; ASEC Augusto J Mier, NSC Asst. Dir Gen for Security Policy; Doctor Clarita Carlos PhD of UP College of Social Sciences and Philosophy, Director Hjayceelyn Quintana, from DFA’s Office of Asia Pacific Affairs and Honorable Florencio Fianza, Special Envoy for Transnational Crimes.

Rear Admiral Danilo M Cortez AFP, the Vice Commander, Philippine Navy, culminates the seminar-workshop with a closing remark.

“We should develop the means and ordinance in drafting a naval strategy that can propel the Navy to its 2020 vision: a strong and credible navy our nation can be proud of,” Cortez said.

Cortez also said that there is going to be a number of difficulties and challenges ahead in transforming the Philippine Navy to be at par with our neighbors in the Southeast Asian region.

“In this regard, as we look forward to the Philippine Navy’s future, we must look with pride and confidence that the Navy will then be modernized and capable of ensured territorial defense operations,” Cortez added.
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bustero

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Re: Merged: Strategic Sail Plan 2020 / The navy charts a new course
« Reply #6 on: July 03, 2009, 08:31:54 AM »
I pray and hope that any strategy that arises will be supported and properly funded for it to achieve it's objectives.

firstknight

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Re: Merged: Strategic Sail Plan 2020 / The navy charts a new course
« Reply #7 on: July 03, 2009, 06:50:11 PM »
i believe PN should also consider in their plan attritions of technical personnel e.g. vessel crew/vessel engineers... despite of the economic slump, the industry is still short of chief officers/chief mates and vessel masters.

like pilots moving to commercial airlines, the potential of luring vessel officers to commercial shipping is high

to address the technical gap, PN should consider partnering with commercial shipping lines like Superferry.  i believe it can be arrange for commercial shipping line to accommodate 2-3 PN personnel for exposure/familiarity.

 

mordoc

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Re: Merged: Strategic Sail Plan 2020 / The navy charts a new course
« Reply #8 on: July 03, 2009, 07:29:25 PM »
like i always say we are a maritime nation so we need to beef up our navy arsenal to defend our shore line hehehehe they can implement the following plan i think i already see some improvement like maintaining and repairing old patrol ship and getting back on service

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Re: Merged: Strategic Sail Plan 2020 / The navy charts a new course
« Reply #9 on: September 13, 2009, 04:31:10 PM »
Leadership Retreat for Navy Officers Reinforces 7 Habits of Effective People
By: LIEUTENANT COLONEL EDGARD A AREVALO PN(M)
Director, Naval Public Affairs Office

Wednesday, 09 September 2009

http://navyspeak.blogspot.com/2009/09/leadership-retreat-for-navy-officers.html

The Philippine Navy concluded its 4-day Leadership Retreat at the Development Academy of the Philippines, Tagaytay City on 04 September 2009. The activity was attended by 30 junior and mid-level officers from various Fleet-Marine units of the Navy.

Anchored on Franklin Covey’s 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, the activity aims to impart among participants principles and techniques among supervisors that would translate in a highly effective workforce and mission accomplishment. Mr. Simon C. Mossesgeld, a team-building and leadership consultant of the Ateneo de Manila University’s Center for Leadership and Change, Inc facilitated the discussions and workshops during the retreat.

The 7 Habits according to Franklin Covey, a global professional-services firm, include the following: be proactive; begin with the end in mind; put first things first; think win-win; seek first to understand, then to be understood; synergize; sharpen the saw.

The Leadership Retreat initiated by the Center for Naval Leadership and Excellence (CNLE) is one of the ventures of the Center in strengthening leadership and excellence in the Officers Corps in line with the Navy Sail Plan 2020. Just last month, the Center conducted the 8th Leg of its Leadership Forum Series with Justice Secretary Reynato S. Puno as the Guest Speaker.

According to Navy Chief Vice Admiral Ferdinand S Golez, these undertakings will greatly improve the professionalism and promote value enhancement among the Navy’s officers personnel. These traits are highly important as the Navy strives to achieve its vision as enunciated in the PN Sail Plan: that by 2020, the Navy shall be strong and credible that the Philippines as a maritime nation can be proud of.
« Last Edit: September 13, 2009, 04:43:06 PM by Adroth »
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Adroth

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Re: Merged: Strategic Sail Plan 2020 / The navy charts a new course
« Reply #10 on: September 15, 2009, 08:18:02 PM »
The Naval Forces Northern Luzon hosts Operational Planning Course

http://nfnl.navy.mil.ph/operational_planning_course.html

The Naval Forces Northern Luzon hosted an Operational Planning Course from 10 to 14 August 2009 and was spearheaded an outsourced team from General Dynamics Information Technology, a group of instructors being tapped mostly for Philippine Defense Reform under the Department of National Defense headed by Mr Roy P Ackley and four others. The course was attended by a total of sixty one (61) Officers and EP from NFNL Organic and OPCON Units, other AFP Unit (PAF), LGU (PNP) and DOTC (PCG).

The course was geared towards a better Command Operational Planning and interoperability operations between other AFP Unit and other Government Agencies within AOR.
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Adroth

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Re: Merged: Strategic Sail Plan 2020 / The navy charts a new course
« Reply #11 on: September 24, 2009, 07:51:57 PM »
Navy Chief affirms commitment to the defense of country
By: LIEUTENANT COLONEL EDGARD A AREVALO PN(M)
Director, Naval Public Affairs Office

Wednesday, 23 September 2009

http://navyspeak.blogspot.com/2009/09/navy-chief-affirms-commitment-to.html

“Your Navy today remains committed to the defense of a united archipelagic Philippines and the security of our maritime economy.” This was the assurance given by Vice Admiral Ferdinand S Golez, Flag Officer In Command, Philippine Navy to students of Miriam College, Quezon City during a lecture on “Philippines: A Maritime Power” on 22 September 2009.

This commitment according to the Navy Chief is anchored on the Navy vision as enunciated in the PN Strategic Sail Plan: that “by 2020, the Navy shall be strong and credible that the Philippines as a maritime nation can be proud of.” “This Sail Plan,” Admiral Golez adds, “serves as a blueprint for evolving towards a more responsive maritime institution that can address the needs of the Navy’s various stakeholders.”

Admiral Golez expounded on the Navy’s three traditional roles: military, constabulary, and diplomatic. He also cited the Navy’s efforts in Mindanao. “At this time, as I speak before you, your Navy is out there principally in the Basilan, Sulu, and Tawi-Tawi archipelago leading the way as the main security force in that part of the country. As envisioned, we aim to attain genuine peace in this area in Mindanao as a prelude to its progress and development,” he said.

Admiral Golez also cited tha Navy’s recent involvement in humanitarian mission where the Navy was the main effort during the search and rescue oeprations in the sinking of Super Ferry 9. He also cited Navy ship BRP Quezon, PS 70 which delievered diesel fuel for Napocor in the island province of Batanes, as well as transported basic commodities for residents in the area. “If the Navy can lead the way in these representative areas of our country, there is no reason why we will not be as relevant for the entire nation,” Vice Admiral Golez declared.

The lecture is part of the celebration of the College of International, Humanitarian and Development Studies (CIHDS) Week of Miriam College. Dr Leticia Ramos Shahani, Dean of CIHDS and one of the authors of the PN Strategic Sail Plan 2020 invited Admiral Golez to deliver a lecture before students of the College.

Part of the FOIC, PN’s lecture was the screening of the Navy instituitonal videos to introduce the Navy to the students. The PMC Quartet Band wowed the students with their song numbers. Joining the FOIC, PN are Maj Gen Juancho Sabban, Commandant, Philippine Marine Corps, Rear Admiral Danilo Cortez, Vice Commander, Philippine Navy, Rear Admiral Feliciano Angue, Chief of Naval Staff, and officers and enlisted personnel from the Fleet-Marine units in the Manila-Cavite area.
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batusai

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Re: Merged: Strategic Sail Plan 2020 / The navy charts a new course
« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2010, 02:48:20 AM »
Hopefully this Sail Plan will address the problems cited in this paper




Question is will the navy acquire skills that are in fact "modern" since in that illustration there is still a gap between existent skills and the present navy which is in fact with obsolete warships.

Will the navy further widen the gap by investing in interim (also obsolete NOW but modern compared to WW2 technology) or take the riskier technology leap to real modern (up to date) warships with at least surface to surface missile capability and fully computerized mission and offensive and defensive weapons suite.

some would still argue and make an example of the maintenance issues/experience of the OTO MELARA guns on the peacock class but hey..they already got the solution..get younger (new recruits even) with the appropriate or the very least parallel skill sets needed to operate a modern warship...

ECE undergraduates, IT undergraduates in both software and networking specializations, mechanical engineering undergrads and what have you and then make sailors out of them. It'll be a bit harder to make sailors who have operated WW2 ships or newer (because they were just recently acquired) but still obsolete ships into programmers or network administrators or at least IT savvy naval personnel who can appreciate and learn more quickly new or at least updated technologies present in "modern" warships.

Ex. Have a childhood friend who got a degree in an IT course from DLSU or was it CSB? anyways, he got petitioned to the U.S. and he got recruited with the US Navy, his job? according to him he operates the system used to launch tomahawk missiles.  :smoke:
« Last Edit: July 14, 2010, 02:52:14 AM by batusai »

Adroth

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Re: Merged: Strategic Sail Plan 2020 / The navy charts a new course
« Reply #13 on: July 14, 2010, 10:58:20 AM »
Will the navy further widen the gap by investing in interim (also obsolete NOW but modern compared to WW2 technology) or take the riskier technology leap to real modern (up to date) warships with at least surface to surface missile capability and fully computerized mission and offensive and defensive weapons suite.

There is more to a modern warship that its weapons.

You have:

-> Modern powerplants

-> Modern shipboard controls (e.g., embedded systems, etc.)

-> The maintenance overhead associated with those systems

-> General best practices for operating at this technological level

Getting used to those bits will require time . . . even without the complexity of missile systems and the like.

Quote
but hey..they already got the solution..get younger (new recruits even) with the appropriate or the very least parallel skill sets needed to operate a modern warship...

Are you implying that the reason skill sets are lacking is simply because of the age of a sailor?

==== ~~~ ====

That diagram is now nine years old. The PN hasn't been sitting on its hands all that time. We are getting there Batusai. Things are getting done . . . you just have to look around to see it.

The PN is inching toward gaining experience with modern systems by way of acquiring ships with all-new capabilities. There ARE acquisition projects for the PN that are in various stages of completion. Here are samples:

-> Multi-Purpose Vessel
-> Strategic Sealift Vessel
-> LCM project

On top of all of this, some of our existing younger ships are getting upgrades with modern systems. Check out the details shared on this video:

http://vimeo.com/4925516


















« Last Edit: July 14, 2010, 11:09:26 AM by Adroth »
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slayermoonlight

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Re: Merged: Strategic Sail Plan 2020 / The navy charts a new course
« Reply #14 on: July 14, 2010, 06:07:27 PM »
wow sosyal ha Sperry Marine pa ang ginamit instead of Furuno.

 :thumbsup:
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