Author Topic: Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?  (Read 4502 times)

Mercenary

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Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?
« on: July 07, 2007, 06:25:25 PM »
Here we folks half way through another year, and the Philippine Military specifically the Phil Air Force has the nation's only missile type a tail-chasing AIM Sidewinder IR homing Air-to-Air Missile out of all the military branches. 

I believe we need to seriously remind ourselves how inadequately the Philippine Armed Forces are in terms of NO modern Missile capability. 

Philippine Air Force

NO all-aspect, IR homing Air-to-Air Missiles

NO Anti-Ship Missiles

NO Air-to-Surface guided Missiles

NO BVR AAM's

Philippine Navy

NO Anti-Ship Missiles

NO Surface to Air Missiles

Philippine Army

NO Anti-Armor Guided Weapons

NO Surface-to-Air Missiles

NO Surface-to-Surface Missiles

Philippine Marines

NO Anti-Armor Guided Weapons

NO SAM's

The simple facts are the Philippine Military is truely still an obsolete military force in the 21st Century! 

I've been participating on this forum for about three years now, (have been following the nation's defense for the last decade) and quite frankly I don't see the Philippine Military ever modernizing all the branches of service.  Sorry but procuring specialized counter terrorism small arms armament and equipment is meager and does not amount except to arm Thee few elite the Philippines have. 

Remember gentlemen, the Philippines lacks ALL types of even the most basic Missiles such as ultra short range Avenger SAM systems or even ATGW's. 

I'll continue to have hope, but over the years it's been all talk and no action.  Bids that degenerate into wishful dreams. 

Do not attack crack troops.

Adroth

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Re: Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?
« Reply #1 on: July 07, 2007, 06:35:07 PM »
Remember gentlemen, the Philippines lacks ALL types of even the most basic Missiles such as ultra short range Avenger SAM systems or even ATGW's.

The situation is MUCH WORSE than you think. Its so bad . . . it can actually be terrifying at times.

- Soldiers with no boots or body armor
- Units without radios
- Medics without supplies
- Armored vehicle personnel without proper helmets and other proper protective equipment
- A government arsenal that is limited in the types of ammunition that it can produce
- Units that have no effective way of moving casualties from first-aid stations to field hospitals
- Rescue helicopters without hoists . . . and use ladders instead
- Helicopter crews that have to buy their own personnal equipment
- Military camps that fail to pay for electrical bills and are disconnected
- Insuffiencient basic trainers for flight instruction
- Lack of a COIN doctrine
- An ageing NCO corps
- Etc. etc. etc.

Given those problems . . . are you really still really worried about AAMs?

If the AFP were in a position where the lack of missiles was enough of a worry to merit serious thought at this time . . . the Timawa Donation Group would not exist because the AFP's needs would be completely beyond the reach of the common tao's ability to help.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2007, 06:45:30 PM by Adroth »
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salbahis

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Re: Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?
« Reply #2 on: July 07, 2007, 07:26:27 PM »
nice one sir A!  :bravo:
Quote
There are goals and efforts for the Philippines to have the capability to defend itself against external aggression. It is not forgotten. We just have to prioritize. - Ruffy Biazon, former congressman of Muntinlupa City 2001-2011

The Philippines  have done an amazing job keeping their Cannon-class Frigate operational–who would have imagined that the World War II veteran (with a U-boat kill to her credit, no less) would still be up and operational for the Balikatan 2010 exercises?  That is an amazing feat, and if there is a Navy out there that can keep an older combatant going, it’s the Philippines’ Navy.

javaman

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Re: Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?
« Reply #3 on: July 07, 2007, 11:27:47 PM »
The situation is MUCH WORSE than you think. Its so bad . . . it can actually be terrifying at times.

- Soldiers with no boots or body armor
- Units without radios
- Medics without supplies
- Armored vehicle personnel without proper helmets and other proper protective equipment
- A government arsenal that is limited in the types of ammunition that it can produce
- Units that have no effective way of moving casualties from first-aid stations to field hospitals
- Rescue helicopters without hoists . . . and use ladders instead
- Helicopter crews that have to buy their own personnal equipment
- Military camps that fail to pay for electrical bills and are disconnected
- Insuffiencient basic trainers for flight instruction
- Lack of a COIN doctrine
- An ageing NCO corps
- Etc. etc. etc.

Given those problems . . . are you really still really worried about AAMs?

If the AFP were in a position where the lack of missiles was enough of a worry to merit serious thought at this time . . . the Timawa Donation Group would not exist because the AFP's needs would be completely beyond the reach of the common tao's ability to help.


It is truly disheartening to know the poor situation of our military organization.  With the muslim and communist insurgency going on for more than 30 years now, there seems to be no end in sight.  There are many debatable arguments "why" i.e: poor training, old and lack of equipment, political will, falling economy, corruption, etc... etc...  Many suggestions "how" i.e. modernize, buy this or that, retrain, reorganize, wait for the economy to boom, etc... etc...

Too big of a problem that somehow reached a level of status quo, some might even have second thoughts of making any hard decisions that can make things worse, fearful of taking steps forward, or worse face a senate inquiry.

If budget or financial reasons remain to be the biggest hurdle in improving our military organization, what can the DND or AFP leadership do to help the economy.  Which of the three branches in the AFP (army, navy, or airforce) can have a great impact in helping the economy? 

It's obvious we cannot improve all three at the same time.  Maybe we can choose one first that will help or improve the other two later, since having helped the government's fiscal problems the other progams for AFP upgrades can then be financed.  Let's push one up first so it can pull the rest to the top later on.  Remember the "talangka" story.

No offense intended to all.  Just a thought and sharing my idea to the forum.  Like many, I too am tired of seeing this country being torn apart.



« Last Edit: July 07, 2007, 11:40:55 PM by javaman »

joeltorres

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Re: Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?
« Reply #4 on: July 08, 2007, 08:13:42 AM »
Can someone verify this? Apparently we have manpads or shoulder-fired missiles? Or at least maybe the rebels have it in the South. If they have it why can't the military have it. But I don't think this is verified.

http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayArticle.asp?xfile=data/theworld/2006/February/theworld_February421.xml&section=theworld
=======================


Philippine airports vulnerable to missile attacks, warns official
(AFP)

14 February 2006



MANILA - Philippine airports are vulnerable to shoulder-fired missile attacks, the country’s top anti-terror diplomat warned Tuesday as the parliament was urged to immediately pass legislation to crack down on terrorism.


The warning from the chairman of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation’s (APEC) anti-terrorism taskforce comes amid reports Al Qaeda-linked militants have strengthened contacts with local Muslim groups throughout the Philippines.

Chairman Benjamin Defensor, also the Philippines’ top envoy on counter-terrorism, said the 21 members of APEC had agreed late last year to boost security in the aviation sector.

He said each member country would be required to submit assessments this year on threats facing their airports after defense analysts warned that shoulder-fired missiles known as manpads posed a serious threat.

“I will tell you right now, our airports (in the Philippines) are not safe,” Defensor told the Foreign Correspondents Association of the Philippines.

He said manpads were traditionally used in conventional warfare to defend against enemy aircraft but could also be used against commercial aircraft.

Philippine airports could be especially vulnerable because of their close proximity to sprawling shanty towns, Defensor said.

Such weapons were also readily available in the Philippines, where Muslim insurgents have for years manufactured similar shoulder-fired rocket launchers in training camps in the country’s south.

The weapon was “very popular,” he said. “You can place it in your luggage, assemble it and you have a deadly weapon. And there is so many of them sold all over the world at rock bottom prices. That is the danger.”


Ricardo Blancaflor, the cabinet minister for anti-terrorism, urged legislators to immediately pass the government’s anti-terror bill which has been locked in Congressional debate for the past 10 years.

Blancaflor told the foreign correspondents club that while security forces have made inroads in their fight against militants, the threat remained.

Defensor said security would be scrutinised at Manila’s international airport and airports in the hubs of central Cebu and southern Davao.

A panel of APEC experts would then rate each airport’s safety and recommend improvements, Defensor said.

He conceded it would be “very expensive” for countries with vulnerable airports to re-route traffic, and that no matter how many extra precautions were taken, terrorists could still find a way to carry out attacks.

At least two southern Philippine airports have been bombed in recent years by Muslim militants believed to have links with Jemaah Islamiyah (JI), the Southeast Asian extremist group blamed for the Bali bombings last year and in 2002 that killed more than 200 people.

In one of the Filipino attacks, militants bombed the waiting area of the Davao international airport in March 2003, killing more than 20 people. In the same month, a busy wharf in Davao was also bombed


 :?
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joeltorres

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Re: Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?
« Reply #5 on: July 08, 2007, 08:42:37 AM »
Can someone verify this? Apparently we have manpads or shoulder-fired missiles? Or at least maybe the rebels have it in the South. If they have it why can't the military have it. But I don't think this is verified.

http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayArticle.asp?xfile=data/theworld/2006/February/theworld_February421.xml&section=theworld
=======================


Philippine airports vulnerable to missile attacks, warns official
(AFP)

14 February 2006



MANILA - Philippine airports are vulnerable to shoulder-fired missile attacks, the country’s top anti-terror diplomat warned Tuesday as the parliament was urged to immediately pass legislation to crack down on terrorism.


The warning from the chairman of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation’s (APEC) anti-terrorism taskforce comes amid reports Al Qaeda-linked militants have strengthened contacts with local Muslim groups throughout the Philippines.

Chairman Benjamin Defensor, also the Philippines’ top envoy on counter-terrorism, said the 21 members of APEC had agreed late last year to boost security in the aviation sector.

He said each member country would be required to submit assessments this year on threats facing their airports after defense analysts warned that shoulder-fired missiles known as manpads posed a serious threat.

“I will tell you right now, our airports (in the Philippines) are not safe,” Defensor told the Foreign Correspondents Association of the Philippines.

He said manpads were traditionally used in conventional warfare to defend against enemy aircraft but could also be used against commercial aircraft.

Philippine airports could be especially vulnerable because of their close proximity to sprawling shanty towns, Defensor said.

Such weapons were also readily available in the Philippines, where Muslim insurgents have for years manufactured similar shoulder-fired rocket launchers in training camps in the country’s south.

The weapon was “very popular,” he said. “You can place it in your luggage, assemble it and you have a deadly weapon. And there is so many of them sold all over the world at rock bottom prices. That is the danger.”


Ricardo Blancaflor, the cabinet minister for anti-terrorism, urged legislators to immediately pass the government’s anti-terror bill which has been locked in Congressional debate for the past 10 years.

Blancaflor told the foreign correspondents club that while security forces have made inroads in their fight against militants, the threat remained.

Defensor said security would be scrutinised at Manila’s international airport and airports in the hubs of central Cebu and southern Davao.

A panel of APEC experts would then rate each airport’s safety and recommend improvements, Defensor said.

He conceded it would be “very expensive” for countries with vulnerable airports to re-route traffic, and that no matter how many extra precautions were taken, terrorists could still find a way to carry out attacks.

At least two southern Philippine airports have been bombed in recent years by Muslim militants believed to have links with Jemaah Islamiyah (JI), the Southeast Asian extremist group blamed for the Bali bombings last year and in 2002 that killed more than 200 people.

In one of the Filipino attacks, militants bombed the waiting area of the Davao international airport in March 2003, killing more than 20 people. In the same month, a busy wharf in Davao was also bombed


 :?

===========================

ADROTH.. I cut this on your other post from another subject.  :lol:
===========================


Adroth
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     Re: philippines' anti-aircraft guns!
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2006, 12:38:42 am »   

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Quote from: BlackJack on September 22, 2006, 12:36:19 am
Meron ba tayong SAM's in case of enemy fighter jets?

Nope.

There are rumors of the PSG having Mistral MANPADs, but no confirmation. 
 
« Last Edit: September 22, 2006, 12:43:27 am by Adroth »  Report to moderator    Logged 

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Tyrael

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Re: Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?
« Reply #6 on: July 08, 2007, 08:49:28 AM »
There was a thread somewhere confirming that we do not have MANPADS-- look it up.
http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?articleid=462818

Out of 90.5 million Filipinos, only 3 million are registered as a taxpayer. This is only 3.31%.. Widen tax collection!

Tarugo

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Re: Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?
« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2007, 05:31:17 PM »
No ASW capability
No Minewarfare capability
Lmited Airlift Capability
Limited Sealift Capability
No submarine capability
Limited anti-armor capability
No Air Defense Capability

I hope we do not lose our COIN warfare capability. Otherwise, we are doomed.


darthnbs

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Re: Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?
« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2007, 08:05:37 PM »
As all the above statements suggest, the Philippine Military is severely handicapped if the Communists and the Muslim Separatists decide to simultaneously launch preemptive strikes all over the country.

I think this is even the cause why the insurgency has taken this too long because the military lacks teeth.


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salbahis

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Re: Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2007, 09:28:50 PM »
possible, pero mas handicapped tayo pag kulang ang basic needs nang mga frontline grunts!, atleast we can still stand for a chance!, let's complete the basic needs before we can proceed to the next level, even if the battlefields evolves thru time, still and it will always be still go down to the basic, sundalo parin ang kailangan!, let's just pray na itong mga bagong Sinators ay hindi nila bwisitin ang mga budget para sa kasundaluhan natin....

peace!!!   :thumbsup:
Quote
There are goals and efforts for the Philippines to have the capability to defend itself against external aggression. It is not forgotten. We just have to prioritize. - Ruffy Biazon, former congressman of Muntinlupa City 2001-2011

The Philippines  have done an amazing job keeping their Cannon-class Frigate operational–who would have imagined that the World War II veteran (with a U-boat kill to her credit, no less) would still be up and operational for the Balikatan 2010 exercises?  That is an amazing feat, and if there is a Navy out there that can keep an older combatant going, it’s the Philippines’ Navy.

mordoc

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Re: Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?
« Reply #10 on: July 08, 2007, 11:07:57 PM »
in simple terms a Armed Force with out a Force to defend our country nice one  (|8|

Adroth

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Re: Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?
« Reply #11 on: July 09, 2007, 02:32:51 AM »
I think this is even the cause why the insurgency has taken this too long because the military lacks teeth.

The insurgency has taken this long because it requires more than military capability to end an insurgency.

As Satur Ocampo stated in an interview with the Philippine Inquirer, during the 90's the NPA was essentially a spent force. Operation Lambat Bitag has taken its toll.

They were only saved from extinction by the fact that the economic development component of Lambat Bitag, which was supposed to be handled by the civilian government, never came about. So the AFP's military gains were wasted.
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salbahis

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Re: Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?
« Reply #12 on: July 09, 2007, 03:26:56 AM »
Sir, what if we do it again?, doing the so called Oplan Lambat-Bitag, do you think we can now crushed those reds?
Quote
There are goals and efforts for the Philippines to have the capability to defend itself against external aggression. It is not forgotten. We just have to prioritize. - Ruffy Biazon, former congressman of Muntinlupa City 2001-2011

The Philippines  have done an amazing job keeping their Cannon-class Frigate operational–who would have imagined that the World War II veteran (with a U-boat kill to her credit, no less) would still be up and operational for the Balikatan 2010 exercises?  That is an amazing feat, and if there is a Navy out there that can keep an older combatant going, it’s the Philippines’ Navy.

Danny Mac

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Re: Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?
« Reply #13 on: July 09, 2007, 04:36:46 AM »

It is truly disheartening to know the poor situation of our military organization. With the muslim and communist insurgency going on for more than 30 years now, there seems to be no end in sight. There are many debatable arguments "why" i.e: poor training, old and lack of equipment, political will, falling economy, corruption, etc... etc... Many suggestions "how" i.e. modernize, buy this or that, retrain, reorganize, wait for the economy to boom, etc... etc...

Too big of a problem that somehow reached a level of status quo, some might even have second thoughts of making any hard decisions that can make things worse, fearful of taking steps forward, or worse face a senate inquiry.

If budget or financial reasons remain to be the biggest hurdle in improving our military organization, what can the DND or AFP leadership do to help the economy. Which of the three branches in the AFP (army, navy, or airforce) can have a great impact in helping the economy?

It's obvious we cannot improve all three at the same time. Maybe we can choose one first that will help or improve the other two later, since having helped the government's fiscal problems the other progams for AFP upgrades can then be financed. Let's push one up first so it can pull the rest to the top later on. Remember the "talangka" story.

No offense intended to all. Just a thought and sharing my idea to the forum. Like many, I too am tired of seeing this country being torn apart.





In times of war, We're still here to fight for our mother country!!!!We are aware of what's happening now in our Armed Forces.. Thou we lack of those equipments, missile or whatsoever still we have soldiers and people who will fight for our country!!! That's Nationalism!!!
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salbahis

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Re: Philippine Military Has One Missile Type?
« Reply #14 on: July 09, 2007, 12:59:36 PM »
like my signatures say's "BASIC" muna bago yan....
Quote
There are goals and efforts for the Philippines to have the capability to defend itself against external aggression. It is not forgotten. We just have to prioritize. - Ruffy Biazon, former congressman of Muntinlupa City 2001-2011

The Philippines  have done an amazing job keeping their Cannon-class Frigate operational–who would have imagined that the World War II veteran (with a U-boat kill to her credit, no less) would still be up and operational for the Balikatan 2010 exercises?  That is an amazing feat, and if there is a Navy out there that can keep an older combatant going, it’s the Philippines’ Navy.